Relationships

Hands make a circle. This article is continued from part 1. One of the most powerful aspects of addiction is its ability to make addicts feel alienated from the rest of the world, and from the people who care about them and want to help them get better. For this reason, recovery needs to inherently have a social aspect that helps addicts overcome this alienation and grow to reach their true potential. Because of this, it’s a good idea to find positive ways to expand your network of social support in drug recovery. Here are some ways to build out your social circle during this crucial time...

Social circle hands One of the most powerful aspects of addiction is its ability to make addicts feel alienated from the rest of the world, and from the people who care about them and want to help them get better. For this reason, recovery needs to inherently have a social aspect that helps addicts overcome this alienation and grow to reach their true potential. Because of this, it’s a good idea to find positive ways to expand your network of social support in recovery. Here are some ways to build out your social circle during this crucial time...

More than 39,000 Americans per year take their own lives. People who struggle with addiction are a whopping 6 times more likely to commit suicide. 1 in 3 people who commit suicide also have drugs in their system, usually opiates or alcohol. It’s obvious that there’s a strong connection between suicide and substance abuse, particularly addiction.

Roommates having a serious talk You’ve noticed that your friend has changed. She’s unable to hold up her responsibilities at home and at work. She’s let some of the hobbies and friends that used to mean so much to her slip away. You’re concerned that her habits with drugs or alcohol are impairing her life, and that she may not be able to fix it alone. How do you help her? What is your responsibility regarding this person that you love? And how do you open up this difficult conversation when she may be very resistant to your concern?

Father talking with teen daughter As a parent, you know that something is wrong with your teen, but you’re worried about broaching the topic. In fact, you’ve probably already had a few conversations, and they haven’t gone well. Conversations about substance abuse are fraught with sensitive feelings, accusations, blame, and defensiveness. It can go south quickly. How can you communicate what you want to say effectively… and maybe even in a way that will elicit change?